Health Care Providers2022-06-17T17:35:45-04:00

Healthcare Providers

Solutions for the Clinical Setting

Common clinical problems. Clink on each picture to find the solution.


Skin tear is among the most common adverse events in nursing home residents transitioning from the hospital – with 88% of occurrences determined to be preventable.1

Skin that has grown thinner and more fragile with age leaves older patients a critically at-risk population in which clinical best practices have traditionally advised against adhesive use.

Comfort Release® changes the adhesive landscape with its atraumatic release technology, presenting a new option for long-term care, home health, and other geriatric treatment settings.


Frequent occurrence of Medical Adhesive-Related Skin Injuries has been observed among patients in the PICU, especially in patients requiring long-term use of medical adhesives, such as central line dressings or in medical adhesives placed in high-moisture areas such as near an endotracheal tube. 2

Pediatric patients are highly susceptible to skin tears due to their underdeveloped subcutaneous tissue.3

Comfort Release® spares this extremely vulnerable population the pain and trauma of adhesive removal – making it a practical choice for pediatric hospitals.


Removal of IV & port insertion site dressings and tapes pull hair and cause pain and skin trauma to susceptible patient populations.
Comfort Release® transparent dressings and tapes protect vulnerable periwound skin in any clinical setting for patients with sensitive skin and those who are immune compromised, take blood thinners, steroids, chemotherapy or other medications that affect the skin.
Explore Clinical Evidence

Acute and Advanced
Wound Care & Prevention

Our innovative tapes, bandages and dressings
support the needs of healthcare providers and patients
in a variety of clinical practice settings.

  • Wound Care Clinics

  • Home Health

  • Ambulatory Facilities

  • Hospice

  • Long-term (Post-Acute Care)

  • Hospitals (Acute Care)

  • Specialty Surgical Centers

  • Dialysis Care

Acute and Advanced
Wound Care & Prevention

Our innovative tapes, bandages and dressings
support the needs of healthcare providers and patients
in a variety of clinical practice settings.

  • Wound Care Clinics

  • Home Health

  • Ambulatory Facilities

  • Hospice

  • Long-term (Post-Acute Care)

  • Hospitals (Acute Care)

  • Specialty Surgical Centers

  • Dialysis Care

Easy to Use On Patients

Our products were created with both the patient and the healthcare provider in mind, so you can seamlessly implement Comfort Release® into clinical workflows while offering patients a better care experience.

Manageable Timescale
Release is triggered within 3-10 seconds of applying isopropyl alcohol.4 Many of our products come with ready-to-go alcohol prep pads.

Remove & Reposition
Once the alcohol evaporates, adhesive strength returns. Comfort Release® also leaves no residual glue, leaving a clean surface to reposition as needed.

Stays in Place
Water resistant to remain adherent during bathing and other standard patient care activities

View Our Products
References
1.Kappor A, Field T, Handler S. JAMA Intern Med. 2019;179:1254-1261.doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2005
2. Kim, Min Ji; Jang, Jeong Mi; Kim, Hye Kyung; Heo, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Ihn Sook Medical Adhesives-Related Skin Injury in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing: November/December 2019 – Volume 46 – Issue 6 – p 491-496 doi: 10.1097/WON.0000000000000592
3. LeBlanc K, Woo K, Christensen D et al. Best practice recommendations for the prevention and management of skin tears.
4. Data on File. Global Biomedical Technology.

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Additional References:
Alvey B & Beck DE. Peristomal dermatology. Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery.2008;21(1), 41-44.
Farris MK, et al. Medical adhesive-related skin injury prevalence. Journal of Wound Ostomy and Continence Nursing. 2015;42(6):589-598.
Gerhardt LC, et al. Skin-textile friction and skin elasticity. Skin research and technology: official journal of International Society for Bioengineering and the Skin. 2009;15(3):288-298.
Holbrook KA. A histological comparison of infant and adult skin. In: Maibach HI, Boisits EK, eds. Neonatal skin: structure and function. 1982.
Kim MJ, Jang JM, Kim HK, Heo, HJ, Jeong IS. Medical adhesives-related skin injury in a pediatric intensive care unit. Journal of Wound Ostomy and Continence Nursing. 2019; 46(6):491-496.
Lund CH, Tucker JA. Adhesion and newborn skin In: Hoath SB, Maibach HI eds. Neonatal skin: Structure and Function. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Marcel Dekker:2003:200-324.
Lund C. Medical Adhesives in the NICU. Newborn Infant. Nurs. Rev. 2014;14(4):160-165
Maene B. Hidden costs of medical tape induced skin injuries.  Wounds UK, 9(1):46-50.
McNichol L, Lund C, Rosen T, Gray M. Medical adhesives and patient safety: state of the science. Consensus statements for the assessment, prevention and treatment of adhesive-related skin injuries. Journal of  Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing. 2013;40(4):365-380.
Napierkowski, D. Uncovering common bacterial skin infections, Nurse Practioner. 2013;38(3), 30-37.
Resnick B. Wound care for the elderly. Geriatr. Nurs. (Lond.). 1993;14:26-29.
Rutter N. Percutaneous drug absorption in the newborn: hazards and uses. Perinatal Pharmacology. 1987; 14(4):911-930.
Shannon ML, Lehman CA. Protecting the skin of the elderly patient in the intensive care unit. Crit. Care Nurs. Clin. North Am. 1996;8(1):17-28.
Smith MA, et al. Pressure-sensitive tape and techniques for its removal from paper. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation. 1984;23(2):101-113.